New Noir: Free: Listen to 298 Episodes of the Vintage Crime Radio Series, Dragnet

dragnet radio

Before it was a film, and before it became a classic television series, Dragnet started out as a long-running radio show, airing from June 3, 1949, to February 26, 1957. One of the most influential crime drama shows from the 50s, Dragnet was the brainchild of Jack Webb, the actor, director and screenwriter who played the lead role of Sergeant Joe Friday. We best remember Joe Friday imploring female informants to provide “Just the facts, ma’am.” But, in actual fact, he never uttered precisely those words. “All we want are the facts” is what he really said. But I digress. Thanks to Archive.org you can now travel back to the 50s and listen to 298 episodes of the show, which was known for its realistic depiction of police work — the boredom, the drudgery, the danger, the occasional acts of heroism, and everything in between.

Note: There were 314 episodes in total. And Archive.org does not house the very first episode called “Robbery,” which first aired on June 3, 1949. That’s available here.

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Free: Listen to 298 Episodes of the Vintage Crime Radio Series, Dragnet is a post from: Open Culture. You can follow Open Culture on Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus and by Email.

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New Noir: Download Vintage Film Posters in High-Res: From The Philadelphia Story to Attack of the Crab Monsters

 

FreeVintagePosters.com offers “hundreds of high quality printable posters in advertising, travel, food/drink, art, movies, westerns, military, magic and much more.” You may have an interest in all those facets of human experience, but we imagine you’ll find especially appealing the site’s selection of high-resolution film posters, suitable for printing at home or elsewhere and hanging on walls in need of cinephilic flair.

Though the site’s collection slants toward classic American films, it also has sheets used to advertise them abroad. Whatever your taste, if you decide to head out to the print shop and commission a paper version of any of these image files in a larger size than you can print at home, do consult StandardPosterSize.net, which, true to its name, provides all manner of information on the various sizings of U.S. standard posters, metric standard posters, U.S. movie posters, and U.K. movie posters. If that sounds like a little too much hassle, you could always just download your favorite poster and set it as your desktop background.

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